Monday, July 23, 2018

Thinking about Software Architecture & Design : Part 14

Of all the acronyms associated with software architecture and design, I suspect that CRUD (Create Read/Report Update Delete) is the most problematic. It is commonly used as a very useful sanity check to ensure that every entity/object created in an architecture is understood in terms of the four fundamental operations : creating, reading, updating and deleting. However, it subtly suggests that the effort/TCO of these four operations are on a par with each other.

In my experience the "U" operation – update  – is the one where there are the most “gotchas” lurking. A create operation – by definition – is one per object/entity. Reads are typically harmless (ignoring some scaling issues for simplicity here). Deletes are one per object/entity, again by definition. More complex than reads generally but not too bad. Updates however, often account for the vast majority of operations performed on objects/entities. The vast majority of the life cycle is spent in updates. Not only that, but each update – by definition again – changes the object/entity and in many architectures updates cascade. i.e. updates cause other updates. This is sometimes exponential as updates trigger other updates. It is also sometimes truly complex in the sense that updates end up,through event cascades, causing further updates to the originally updated objects....

I am a big fan of the CRUD checklist to cover off gaps in architectures early on but I have learned through experience that dwelling on the Update use-cases and thinking through the update cascades can significantly reduce the total cost of ownership of many information architectures.

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